He was obliged to wait for the body of the army corps, and he had received orders to concentrate his forces before entering into line; but at five o'clock, perceiving Wellington's peril, Blucher ordered Bulow to attack, and uttered these remarkable words:...For excusations, cessions, modesty itself well governed, are but arts of ostentation. And amongst those arts there is none better, than that which Plinius Secundus speaketh of; which is to be liberal of praise and commendation to others, in that wherein a man\'s self hath any perfection. For saith Pliny very wittily; In commending another, you do your self right; for he that you commend, is either superior to you, in that you commend, or inferior. ...He read, and read everything that came to hand. On coming home, while his valets were still taking off his things, he picked up a book and began to read. From reading he passed to sleeping, from sleeping to gossip in drawing rooms of the Club, from gossip to carousals and women; from carousals back to gossip, reading, and wine. Drinking became more and more a physical and also a moral necessity. Though the doctors warned him that with his corpulence wine was dangerous for him, he drank a great deal. He was only quite at ease when having poured several glasses of wine mechanically into his large mouth he felt a pleasant warmth in his body, an amiability toward all his fellows, and a readiness to respond superficially to every idea without probing it deeply. Only after emptying a bottle or two did he feel dimly that the terribly tangled skein of life which previously had terrified him was not as dreadful as he had thought. He was always conscious of some aspect of that skein, as with a buzzing in his head after dinner or supper he chatted or listened to conversation or read. But under the influence of wine he said to himself: "It doesn't matter. I'll get it unraveled. I have a solution ready, but have no time now- I'll think it all out later on!" But the later on never came.,"I am not going anywhere," Natasha replied when this was proposed to her. "Do please just leave me alone!" And she ran out of the room, with difficulty refraining from tears of vexation and irritation rather than of sorrow.,,He gave a short, booming laugh. ;

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Monsieur le Maire!",Since I am innocent of this crime, sir, I find it decidedly inconvenient,There lay in the inflection of voice which accompanied these words something indescribably fierce and frenzied..In venery this is called false re-imbushment.,The looks of the plain Countess Mary always improved when she was in tears. She never cried from pain or vexation, but always from sorrow or pity, and when she wept her radiant eyes acquired an irresistible charm.,.;

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